Tag Archives: Linux

VMware Fusion 5.02 Linux VM Crashes During Login (Ubuntu)

After running an update on my Macbook Pro, my linux VMs stopped allowing me to login and would simply crash.  I contacted VMware support and they advised that the update, along with Fusion update 5.02, don’t play very well together due to a graphics driver issue.  See the short post: http://blogs.vmware.com/teamfusion/2012/11/macbook-air-and-macbook-pro-update-2-0-and-vmware-fusion-5.html.

The workaround requires that you go into Settings > Display and turn off “Accelerate 3D Graphics”.  While this fix works just fine, it hampers your ability to work in the Linux VM due to the fact that you can’t resize the VM’s work area.

 

Continue reading VMware Fusion 5.02 Linux VM Crashes During Login (Ubuntu)

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VMware Tools Install Error Creating Symlink VMware_Virtual_Printer.ppd pointing to file thinprint.ppd

I ran into this error the other night and wanted to make a quick post on it while installing VMware tools into Backtrack Linux.

Unable to create symlink “/etc/cups/ppd/VMware_Virtual_Printer.ppd” pointing to file “/usr/lib/vmware-tools/configurator/thinprint.ppd”.

Execution aborted.

There’s a really quick solution to this.  Backtrack (5 R2) has cups installed by default so that’s not the problem, but for some reason the tools can’t create the ppd directory.  Create the ppd directory in /etc/cups manually and you should be good-to-go.  This occurred with VMware tools 8.8 and the KDE 64-bit build of Backtrack.

Good luck and hope this helps someone get a quick fix.

Use Console to Connect ESX to a NAS

UPDATED 12/5/2009 to include vSphere commands.

This is a quick note, mostly to help remind me and hopefully help someone else out.

You can use standard Linux commands to connect an ESX host to a NAS (Network Attached Storage) device.  You can use a NAS to store things like ISO’s and backups.  I have many gig’s of ISO’s and I really don’t like them taking up valuable storage on my ESX host.  In production, they’d be taking up SAN space, so I offload them to a Buffalo Terastation, and use Linux commands to mount the Terastation so that ESX can utilize it.

First you can make a directory under vmimages.

mkdir /vmimages/ISO2

ISO2 is the directory that you are creating.  For me, ISO already points to a local directory on my server where I keep one or two ISO’s that I am continually using.  Then you can run the command:

(ESX 3.5)  mount –t smbfs //[nas]/[folder] /vmimages/ISO2
(vSphere) mount –t cifs //[nas]/[folder] /vmimages/ISO2

Continue reading Use Console to Connect ESX to a NAS

Use Console to Connect ESX to a NAS

This is a quick note, mostly to help remind me and hopefully help someone else out.

You can use standard Linux commands to connect an ESX host to a NAS (Network Attached Storage) device.  You can use a NAS to store things like ISO’s and backups.  I have many gig’s of ISO’s and I really don’t like them taking up valuable storage on my ESX host.  In production, they’d be taking up SAN space, so I offload them to a Buffalo Terastation, and use Linux commands to mount the Terastation so that ESX can utilize it.

After logging into the ESX console using the root account or a root privileged account, you can make a directory under vmimages.

mkdir /vmimages/ISO2

ISO2 is the directory that you are creating.  For me, ISO already points to a local directory on my server where I keep one or two ISO’s that I am continually using.  Then you can run the command:

mount –t smbfs //[nas]/[folder] /vmimages/ISO2

Continue reading Use Console to Connect ESX to a NAS

YUM Updates Failing for Linux

This is just a quick note to maybe help someone not have to endure the frustration I had over a few hours of last week trying to figure out why my Linux host was failing to download packages.  I kept getting ‘header incomplete’ errors, and ‘there are no more mirrors to try’.

Unfortunately, this is a pretty common-place error, so the content on the Internet was broad.  What my particular issue ended up being is that my security appliance prevents http range downloads.  The anti-virus software on the appliance in particular, blocks that style of download due to the fact that you may be able to download a virus in pieces rather than all at once, and therefore the scan would miss it.

Some versions of Linux have been updated to pull the whole files down intact and in a single shot, but if you’re running a version that doesn’t, there are some alternatives.  I took the easy way out and put the box on a less network that allowed me to download and apply all the updates.  Apparently you can create your own package synchronization site within the boundaries of your network and have your Linux hosts update from that.  As I said, I took the easy way out.  You can also disable the virus scanner on your security appliance or router, or add a rule that allows HTTP range downloads.  I decided against that since I want to be as secure as I can.

So if you’re running into that error.  A quick fix is bypassing your security appliance for the update. 🙂

Good luck.

Groundwork Open Source Monitoring

 GWOS001A few years ago, I wanted to try out a free network and system monitoring package so I decided to download and try to setup Nagios.  Since I’m no Linux guru, though working with Linux has started to change lately, it took me quite a while to get Nagios setup and configured.  After doing so, I finally realized that I had to manually edit text files on the environment, Linux, to configure host monitoring.  What a monumental pain!  Learning to use VI, then realizing that nano is much easier to use, but still, it took over an hour for me to figure out how to setup monitoring of a single host.  As I’ve been running VMware virtualization for years now, setting up and tearing down servers is almost part of my daily life.  Configuring monitoring of these servers immediately became a burden I wasn’t willing to undertake.

Then I discovered Groundwork Open Source (GWOS).  What a cool package!  Not to mention, they have a virtual appliance already setup and configured for free (the community edition).

Continue reading Groundwork Open Source Monitoring

Configuring WordPress automatic upgrades and updates

This is quick note on setting up auto-updates / downloads for WordPress builds that are being self-hosted.

I had the issue of being constantly asked for FTP information, even after I set up an FTP server.

I had trouble finding anything on the Internet that discussed issues with the WordPress auto-updates and downloads directly from the environment for self-hosted installations.  Turns out the issues I had were permission based issues.  The fix for this was needing to change the ownership and the group to www-data for wordpress folder and the wordpress/wp-content folder.  You can accomplish this by using the commands at the linux prompt:

chown –R www-data /usr/share/wordpress/*
chgrp –R www-data /usr/share/wordpress/*
chown –R www-data /usr/share/wordpress/wp-content/*
chgrp –R www-data /usr/share/wordpress/wp-content/*

Replace the “wordpress” folder name with whatever folder your wordpress web folder is.

This will also allow you to download plugins and themes directly from the WP web interface.

Thanks Bobby for helping me with this.