Tag Archives: PowerShell

Enable Jumbo Frame Support in vSphere Using PowerCLI in 30 Seconds. :)

This applies to virtual switches that have already been created.

I was trying to do this earlier this evening and found a few articles that talked about various methods to enable jumbo frame support on a vSwitch.  After reading some of the ‘hacks’ that are being used, I decided to dig into PowerCLI.  Amazingly enough, the solution is so simple that maybe it’ll get some of the people working with vSphere to move into PowerCLI further.  Here’s the 30 second or less solution to the issue.  As I wrote above, this applies for a vSwitch that’s already been created, but you can create a vSwitch with all the specifications you need from PowerCLI as well just the New-VirtualSwitch commandlet.

> $vs = Get-VirtualSwitch –name vSwitchX
> Set-VirtualSwitch –VirtualSwitch $vs –mtu 9000

> Get-VirtualSwitch –name vSwitchX

If you’re not familiar with PowerShell, get familiar with it. 🙂 It’s an excellent product and is expandable so many IT products are moving toward a PowerShell interface for its ease of use.

Continue reading Enable Jumbo Frame Support in vSphere Using PowerCLI in 30 Seconds. 🙂

vSphere PowerCLI Commandlet Poster

Pablo Roesch, VMware, has put out a poster that their marketing department did, that has a listing of the PowerCLI commandlets.  This is a very useful tool for anyone working in PowerShell using the VMware Toolkit for Windows.

It’s originally posted in this forum a VMware forum: http://bit.ly/1602Au

I’ve placed a the file in my media library and linked to it from here, just in case it disappears. 😉

PowerCli Poster in PDF format.

Sample:
PowerCLI Poster

Thanks for the great poster VMware, and thanks for linking it Pablo!

VMware VI Toolkit for Windows – Tip: Regular Expressions

The importance of having a naming schema for your virtual machines in VMware VI (ESX / Virtual Center) has become much more important with the release of the VI Toolkit for Windows.

If you’re not sure what the VI Toolkit for Windows is, please see a post that I wrote earlier this month: VMware VI Toolkit For Windows.

The VI Toolkit can allow you to automate and script a lot of tasks that would require quite a bit of UI interaction with the VI client.  Something that you can do to facilitate this effort is by naming your virtual machines with a consistent pattern.  A typical naming convention might end with a tag about the server’s function and a number representing the server’s redundancy.

Continue reading VMware VI Toolkit for Windows – Tip: Regular Expressions

Windows PowerShell sticker, and /n Software for free

So after following a link from a buddy’s blog, Bobby Shea, I started browsing around /n software’s web site. I filled out the form for a free Windows PowerShell Sticker, again – yes, they didn’t send it months ago the first time I tried, and I found something else interesting on their site.

Months ago, the first time I visited /n’s site, I downloaded a trial version of Netcmdlets.  Netcmdlets is /n’s PowerShell snap-in that extends PS into remoting, SSH, and other network protocols.  I ended up uninstalling the software after the trial was over.  Now, the software is FREE for hobbyists!  Since I’m not using PowerShell for work with clients, restricting my PS activities to my home network and ‘playing around’, I’m qualified as a hobbyist!  I’m on my way to download right now!

If you’re not familiar with NetCmdlets, you should definitely check out the site, the description, fill out the form for your sticker and keep your fingers crossed, then download the hobbyist version, unless you’re planning on using it commercially in which case, pay /n some money. 🙂

A quick list of the features, taken from the /n site are:

Device Management SNMP device monitoring and management capabilities, complete with SNMPv3 Security.
Remote Access Secure Shell enabled remote execution using Rexec, Rshell, or SSH.
Directory Administration Access Active Directory or OpenLDAP servers through LDAP Directory Access.
Email Send & Receive Send HTML Emails or Emails with file attachments. Retrieve Email through POP or IMAP Connectivity.
File Transfer File transfer capabilities through FTP, TFTP, & RCP connectivity.
Instant Messaging Jabber Instant Messaging, SMS messaging, and Alphanumeric Paging.
Network Monitoring Listen and react to SNMP Traps and Syslog event messages or access raw Ethernet Packet captures.
Access to Web Services Connect to web services through HTTP and RSS client capabilities.
DNS Configuration Monitor DNS and other network configuration changes.
Encoding / Decoding A complete array of utility encoding and decoding capabilities including MIME, UUEncoding, URL, Hex, etc.
Zip Compression File compression including password protection, AES Encryption, and 4GB+ archive support.

This is really good stuff, at a great price, free!  Check it out.  If you type instead of click, and you know who you are, you really need these tools.

/n software inc. – Show your support for Windows PowerShell!

Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part IV – Configuring MOSS

Ok, this is the last entry in this series of tutorials for setting up a MOSS development environment.  In the prior posts, we installed SQL Server, installed MOSS, installed VS.NET and some other supporting products, and in this post, we’ll configure MOSS.  The plan for this configuration is to go through the basic farm configuration with assigning roles to our server and setting up a web application.  As an additional task, we’ll extend the web application that we create and configure it for secure (https) access.  I’ve discovered that in most deployments, clients are looking for secure websites, so it makes sense to develop on one whenever possible.

Here are the links to the prior posts in this series:

Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part I – SQL Server Installation
Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part II – MOSS Installation
Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part III – VS.NET Installation

Prework

There are a few things that we’ll need to do as prework for completing this tutorial.  Create the following accounts:

WssSearchService (we’ll use this account for all of SharePoint’s search functionality)
SpsContentAccess (used for the content access account for indexing)
MainAppPool (we’ll use this for the app pool account)
MossSspAccount
(will be used for the SSP application pool)
MossWebApp01 (will be used for the main web application)

Continue reading Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part IV – Configuring MOSS

Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part III – VS.NET Installation

Welcome back and onto part III of this installation guide.  This installment will document installing Visual Studio .NET 2008 and also discuss the additional software that is advised to facilitate MOSS development.

Parts one and two can be found here:

Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part I – SQL Server Installation
Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part II – MOSS Installation

If you’re following along, great, and if you’re just coming across this entry because you wanted a sample of the software to install in the environment to facilitate development, that’s great too.  I hope this entry helps.  Installing Visual Studio .NET is pretty straight forward, the only thing I do different than the standard install is change the installation path, and remove SQL Express since we installed that during step one, so before I move onto documenting that, I’ll list the software that I add to development environments.

Software to add to your MOSS Development Environments

BDC Metadata Manager
Fiddler HTTP Debugger
Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar
Lutz Roeder’s .NET Reflector
PowerShell
Microsoft Office 2007
SharePoint Designer
Visual Studio 2008 Extensions for Windows SharePoint Services (VSeWSS)
Visual Studio 2005 Tools for the 2007 Microsoft Office System (VSTO)
WSS 3.0 SDK
MOSS 2007 SDK

From the above software list, everything is either included with your MSDN License (hopefully you have one) or available as a free download, with the exception of BDC Metadata Manager.  However for BDC Meta Man, you can download a light-weight free version of the product that will allow you demonstrate functionality.

Continue reading Tutorial: Creating A MOSS Development Environment Part III – VS.NET Installation

VMware VI Toolkit For Windows

Ok, I’m a little excited… well a lot excited!

PowerShell, imho, is one of the best and most powerful tools that Microsoft has released in quite some time.  Now toward proving that statement, VMware has created a PowerShell snap-in for VI (Virtual Infrastructure).  If you’re not sure what PowerShell is, a little research would help you greatly, but suffice it to say that it is a scripting engine that will not only allow you to manage Microsoft infrastructure, but also can also script against the .NET framework.  That’s right, no Visual Studio needed for quick tasks.  Some scripting background will help you out with this, but it’s not difficult to pick up if you’ve never scripted before.  If you don’t know what VI is, you probably shouldn’t be reading this entry. ;)  But alas, I digress…

Continue reading VMware VI Toolkit For Windows