Tag Archives: Virtual Appliance

vSphere 5.5 Client Integration Plug-In on Mac OSX Error

This took me quite a while to track this down so I decided to post a quick article on it.

Symptom:  Getting page cannot be displayed errors when attempting to access a virtual machine’s (VM) console while using Safari, Firefox, or Chrome on a mac.  This only applies for people using the VCSA (VMware vCenter Server Appliance) and running version 5.5.

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Create a Router with Front Firewall using Vyatta on VMware Workstation

Vyatta is a powerful enterprise class software router that has some really incredible features.  It has a CLI (command line interface) as well as a web interface.  I’ve gotten a few requests about configuring it as a front system but until now have only really worked with Vyatta as a pure routing appliance internal to my network.  It has been my traffic cop between my lab subnet, user subnet, and server subnet but now I’ll try to configure it as a front end based on an exchange I had on another thread.

This should be able to give you some examples with getting started using Vyatta as a front firewall.

If you don’t have the software, you can download a free version, called Vyatta Core, from Vyatta’s website.  You have to register, but don’t worry, they won’t spam you and they have extensive documentation on the product that you can pull down after registering.  It’s an excellent resource to learn and practice your routing skills, especially since you can stand up the product on random hardware or in a virtual machine.  Vyatta even has downloads specific to VMware implementations.  Check it out and come back if you’re interested in seeing this post through.  http://www.vyatta.com.

And now for the good part.

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Groundwork Open Source Monitoring

 GWOS001A few years ago, I wanted to try out a free network and system monitoring package so I decided to download and try to setup Nagios.  Since I’m no Linux guru, though working with Linux has started to change lately, it took me quite a while to get Nagios setup and configured.  After doing so, I finally realized that I had to manually edit text files on the environment, Linux, to configure host monitoring.  What a monumental pain!  Learning to use VI, then realizing that nano is much easier to use, but still, it took over an hour for me to figure out how to setup monitoring of a single host.  As I’ve been running VMware virtualization for years now, setting up and tearing down servers is almost part of my daily life.  Configuring monitoring of these servers immediately became a burden I wasn’t willing to undertake.

Then I discovered Groundwork Open Source (GWOS).  What a cool package!  Not to mention, they have a virtual appliance already setup and configured for free (the community edition).

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